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The latest news to keep your mind and body fit

Sunday 1/17/21

Sunday 1/17/21

“Out of the Box”
For Time:
20 Box Jumps (30″/24″)
40 Strict Press (75/55)
600 Meter Run
80 Russian Kettlebell Swings (70/53)
600 Meter Run
40 Strict Press (75/55)
20 Box Jumps (30″/24″)

Intermediate: 55/35
Novice: 45/25


“If people knew how hard I worked to achieve my mastery, it wouldn’t seem so wonderful after all.” – Michelangelo

A quote from a man who is recognized as one of the greatest artists of all time.

There’s the intoxicating myth in our society that there is such a thing as natural-born talent. Some kind of mystical factor that leads to such heights of achievement. Yet here he is, Michelangelo himself, expressing his magic secret.

It’s easy to dismiss achievements to factors we can’t control. To say history is by chance. It’s far harder, to admit that it’s another level of true grit and unrelenting effort. To realize that the great Michaelangelo simply worked his ass off.

Greatness is not by chance. It is by choice. Let’s get to work.

 

Saturday 1/16/21

Saturday 1/16/21

“Heavy Machinery”
5 Rounds For Reps:
1 Minute Max Calorie Row
1 Minute Max Power Cleans (135/95)
1 Minute Max Burpees
1 Minute Rest

Rx+: 155/105
Intermediate: 95/65
Novice: 65/45


“I define anxiety as experiencing failure in advance.” – Seth Godin

It’s not abnormal to feel the nerves before something big. We have a several thousand year-old survival mechanism that wants to protect us. A bit outdated maybe, but it’s still alive and well.

This made sense when being chased by predators, or at risk of running out of food. Yet, our day to day actions are different now. Not only do we not need to prepare for catastrophic failure… we should resist it.

What we think, we will become. And if we dwell on the thought on failing, it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. We start to focus in, on a subconscious level, on the reasons we will fail. Of course, we’re not in an imaginary world here… we will fail… but it’s the paradigm shift we’re after. Think less about all the reasons we’ll fail, and more, about all the reasons we will succeed.”

 

Friday 1/15/21

Friday 1/15/21

Barbell Complex
On the 1:30 x 6 Sets:
3 Front Squats
3 Push Press

“Blitzen”
5 Rounds For Time:
20/15 Calorie Row
10 Thrusters (95/65)

Rx+: 115/85
Intermediate: 75/55
Novice: 55/35


“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I’ll remember. Involve me, and I’ll learn.” – Benjamin Franklin

The musician doesn’t learn by listening. The musician learns by playing. It’s how the mind, in its ever plastic state, adapts. It responds to application.

In Edgar Dale’s “Cone of Learning”, we learn:
10% of what we read.
20% of what we hear.
30% of what we see.
50% of what we hear and see.
70% of what we say and write.
90% of what we actually participate in.

Information without application, is knowledge.
Information with application, is wisdom.

 

Thursday 1/14/21

Thursday 1/14/21

“Wunderful”
10 Rounds For Time [25 Minute Cap]:
30 Double Unders
20 AbMat Sit-ups
10 Hand Release Push-ups


“Only a man who knows what it’s like to be defeated, can reach down to the bottom of his soul with the extra ounce of power to win, when the match is even.” – Muhammad Ali

It’s commonplace to look at mistakes, miscues, and losses as negatives. And it’s even more common, to view them as setbacks. Yet here, one of the greatest of time, offers the difference maker in an otherwise even fight between two opponents:

Failure.

Through the experience of failure, the fighter becomes the victor. Not because of the pain of loss, or the embarrassment of defeat. But through viewing failure as a chance to start again, more equipped. More prepared. More experienced.

Wednesday 1/13/21

Wednesday 1/13/21

“Control-Alt-Delete”
On the 5:00 x 4 Rounds:
20 Alternating Dumbbell Snatches (50/35)
40 Air Squats
20/15 Calorie Row

Rx+: 75/50
Intermediate: 40/30
Novice: 25/15


“When I write, I feel like an armless, legless man with a crayon in his mouth.” – Kurt Vonnegut

It can be easy to forget that even the greats are full of awkwardness and clumsiness. Yet the man quoted above is known to have changed the face of American literature.

But despite Vonnegut’s success, he didn’t start that way. It was full of fumbles, false starts, and embarrassing mistakes. Yet where others in his shoes stopped, he chose to keep going. Forcing himself to move forward. He kept taking one more step, even when the process did not seem rewarding.

Awkward and clumsy is not just OK… it’s part of the way.

 

Tuesday 1/12/21

Tuesday 1/12/21

“DelighT”
AMRAP 15:
12 Box Jump Overs (24″/20″)
12 Deadlifts (135/95)
9 Bar-Facing Burpees
9 Hang Power Cleans (135/95)
6 Strict Pull-ups
6 Push Jerks (135/95)

Rx+ 155/105
Intermediate: 95/65
Novice: 65/45


“If you can’t fly, then run. If you can run, then walk. If you can’t walk, then crawl. But whatever you do, you have to keep moving forward.” – Martin Luther King Jr

Comedian Jerry Seinfeld had a daily practice, which was a promise to himself. To “never break the chain”.

Every day, Jerry promised himself that he would write a joke, every single day. The length, the topic, and even how funny it was came second to the fact – that it was completed. Some days the jokes were incredibly funny. Other days, hardly. Some jokes were long, some were barely a sentence. But he “never broke the chain”.

What Jerry was doing, was committing himself to make forward movement, every, single, day. Some days it was inch, and some days it was a mile. And this seemingly simple practice, to place tangible action into every day, resulted in one of the greatest comedians of his time.

As Martin Luther expresses, it’s not about the magnitude of the progress. All that matters, is that we’re moving forward.

 

Monday 1/11/21

Monday 1/11/21

“Full Circle”
For Time:
1,500 Meter Row
100 Double Unders
1,000 Meter Row
100 Double Unders
1,500 Meter Row


“Our patience will achieve more than our force.” – Edmund Burke

We are emotional beings. And we can only be rational, after we’ve been emotional.

When we see someone who is composed under adversity, it’s not that they aren’t an emotional person. Those feelings are there. What’s different (compared to the explosive nature of a “hot head”) is the closing of a certain gap. That of between an emotional reaction, and the subsequent replacement of rational thought.

Abraham Lincoln exercised this understanding through his “hot letters”. When he became fuming mad at someone, he forced himself to complete a task before taking his wrath directly to the individual. He wrote a letter to the offender, outlining all the wrongs and misdoings that have been committed. He held nothing back. Then, he would fold it up, place the letter in an envelope, place it in his desk drawer, and… never send it.

Think through the last time we lost our temper on someone. Was it worth it? Emotions will cool. And we can proceed in a more reasonable fashion that we won’t regret. We just need to acknowledge that gap, and work ourselves there through patience.

 

Sunday 1/10/21

Sunday 1/10/21

“Floor Warmer”
For Time:
2,000/1600 Meter Row
50 Floor Press (135/95)
2,000/1600 Meter Row


“Our patience will achieve more than our force.” – Edmund Burke

We are emotional beings. And we can only be rational, after we’ve been emotional.

When we see someone who is composed under adversity, it’s not that they aren’t an emotional person. Those feelings are there. What’s different (compared to the explosive nature of a “hot head”) is the closing of a certain gap. That of between an emotional reaction, and the subsequent replacement of rational thought.

Abraham Lincoln exercised this understanding through his “hot letters”. When he became fuming mad at someone, he forced himself to complete a task before taking his wrath directly to the individual. He wrote a letter to the offender, outlining all the wrongs and misdoings that have been committed. He held nothing back. Then, he would fold it up, place the letter in an envelope, place it in his desk drawer, and… never send it.

Think through the last time we lost our temper on someone. Was it worth it? Emotions will cool. And we can proceed in a more reasonable fashion that we won’t regret. We just need to acknowledge that gap, and work ourselves there through patience.

Saturday 1/9/21

Saturday 1/9/21

“Team Marston”
10 Rounds Each:
1 Deadlift (315/220)
10 Toes to Bar
15 Bar Facing Burpees

* Switch After Full Rounds
* 30 Minute Time Cap

Intermediate: 225/155
Novice: 95/65


“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I’ll remember. Involve me, and I’ll learn.” – Benjamin Franklin

The musician doesn’t learn by listening. The musician learns by playing. It’s how the mind, in its ever plastic state, adapts. It responds to application.

In Edgar Dale’s “Cone of Learning”, we learn:
10% of what we read.
20% of what we hear.
30% of what we see.
50% of what we hear and see.
70% of what we say and write.
90% of what we actually participate in.

Information without application, is knowledge.
Information with application, is wisdom.

Friday 1/8/21

Friday 1/8/21

“Cannonball”
5 Rounds For Time:
21/15 Calorie Row
15 Box Jump Overs (24″/20″)
7 Squat Cleans (135/95)

Intermediate: 95/65
Novice: 45/25


“Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad.”

Although “knowledge” and “wisdom” are words often lumped into the same category, they are miles apart. The difference between the two: application.

Gaining knowledge, in and of itself, is relatively simple. But purely gaining knowledge doesn’t change who we are. We can place a turbocharged engine under the hood, but it’s not connected to the drivetrain, we won’t drive faster. We might even drive slower, clouding our efforts with “unusable weight”.

Wisdom on the other hand, takes effort. It takes trial, error, pain, blood, sweat, and tears. And it’s a lifelong practice.

Knowing is not half the battle. It’s not even a quarter. It’s the first 10%, if that. What we are after… knowledge in action.

Thursday 1/7/21

Thursday 1/7/21

“Handle With Care”
On the 5:00 x 6 Rounds:
500/400 Meter Row
21 Hand Release Push-ups
12 Kettlebell Swings (70/53)

Intermediate: 53/35
Novice: 30/20


“Real fears can be overcome. It’s the imaginary ones that are unconquerable.” – Theodore Vale

Fear can be absolutely paralyzing. And it’s wise of us to recognize that it’s “fear” that’s paralyzing… not an actual event taking place. Said another way, our mental reaction to an external event can paralyze us.

FEAR = False Evidence Appearing Real.

If there ever was a superpower that we have, it’s the tremendous ability to bring whatever we’re thinking into reality. And if you’re human, you can draw back to a time where we brought a fear – a mental reaction to an external event – into reality. We talked ourselves into failure… before we even began. We convinced ourselves it couldn’t be done, and deemed it impossible, before even trying.

The unconquerable fear, as Theodore Vale puts it, is the imaginary one. It’s human to question, doubt, and fear. But this thousand-year-old survival mechanism, which means well, is leading us down the path of hesitancy. Of inaction.

The same mind that builds a paralyzing fear can break one down.
It comes down to where we focus our thoughts.
Instead of dwelling on what could go wrong, dwell on why it will go right.

Wednesday 1/6/21

Wednesday 1/6/21

Pausing Overhead Squat
On the Minute x 10 Sets:
1 Pausing Overhead Squat

*Pause 10 Seconds in Bottom*

“Grimace”
21-15-9:
Overhead Squats (95/65)
Toes to Bar

Directly Into…

15-12-9
Thrusters (95/65)
Chest to Bar Pull-ups

Intermediate: 65/45
Novice: 45/25


“Never confuse movement, with action” – Ernest Hemingway

Busy work is our mortal enemy.

“Movement” in the quote above refers to taking care of the pressing and loud items in our day. The emails. The text messages. The bills. Parts that need to be done eventually, but are seemingly far more urgent in the moment than they are in reality. For at the days end, as we climb into bed, the days that were consumed with such busy work leave us feeling the least fulfilled. We may find ourselves saying to ourselves, “What the hell did I do today?”

This is because shear movement does not push us towards our goals. Only action does. Action is premeditated effort, driven by purpose. It’s calculated energy, versus reactive motions. Swimming forward, versus treading water.

This quote urges us to recognize the difference between the two. As we review our recent days, where are we in motion, and where are we in action?

Tuesday 1/5/21

Tuesday 1/5/21

“Sore Eyes”
AMRAP 20:
20 Wallballs (20/14)
20 Power Snatches (75/55)
20 Box Jumps (24″/20″)
20 Push Presses (75/55)
20/14 Calorie Row

Intermediate: 55/35
Novice: 45/25


“Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment, until it becomes a memory.” – Dr Suess

Words from a childrens’ book, but words that reach far beyond.

It’s easy to get caught up in “life”.
To be so focused on chasing our next goal. Hunting that next accomplishment.

Dr Suess gives us a grounding thought: to value the present. To appreciate the moments in front of us, despite how tempting it may be to look ahead. In today’s world, we’re moving faster than ever. Planning more than ever. Forecasting more than ever. But in all the plans that we could possibly dream up, regardless of how big and audacious as they may be, do not create memories. Only today can.

Monday 1/4/21

Monday 1/4/21

“Barn Burner”
AMRAP 3:
50 Double Unders
21 Bar-Facing Burpees
Max Power Cleans (95/65)

Rest 3 Minutes

AMRAP 3:
50 Double Unders
18 Bar-Facing Burpees
Max Power Cleans (115/85)

Rest 3 Minutes

AMRAP 3:
50 Double Unders
15 Bar-Facing Burpees
Max Power Cleans (135/95)

Rest 3 Minutes

AMRAP 3:
50 Double Unders
12 Bar-Facing Burpees
Max Power Cleans (155/105)

Rest 3 Minutes

AMRAP 3:
50 Double Unders
9 Bar-Facing Burpees
Max Power Cleans (185/135)

Intermediate: 65/45, 75/55, 95/65, 115/85, 135/95
Novice: 45/25, 55/35, 65/45, 75/55, 95/65


“Think like an immigrant. Act like an artisan.”

To “think like an immigrant” is to have a mindset where nothing is owed. There’s no legacy spot awaiting me. I’m not owed a job, a title bump, or a promotion. That no matter who or what I was yesterday, I’m brand new today. So I better plan to work harder than I ever have before to achieve my goals.

To “act like an artisan”, is to live a life of passion. In the middle-ages, before mass production, every pair of shoes, every saddle, tool and utensil were made by hand. All one-off productions. By a creator, called an artisan. Artisans took great pride in their work, and would carve their initials into each piece they created.

Regardless of what we’ve accomplished, nothing is owed to us. Yesterday is gone… and we’ll earn today. And in everything we do, let’s take so much care that we could proudly etch our name into the side of our work for the world to see. We are humble, we are hungry, and we are the hardest damn workers in the room.

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